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Piscotty’s First 60 Games Among Best in Cardinals History

Saturday night’€™s 98th win of the season for the St. Louis Cardinals, over the Milwaukee Brewers at Busch Stadium, was also Stephen Piscotty‘s 60th contest as a Major Leaguer.

The 24-year-old marked the occasion with what seemed like a typical outing for him. Piscotty played the entire game in right field, and at the plate, went 2-for-4 including a double and two runs scored.

Back when Piscotty was 30 games into his career, we took a look at his stats compared to the very best starts in Cardinals history. At that point, Piscotty’s 15 extra-base hits were a major differentiator, ranking him fourth all-time compared to other new Cardinals hitters.

Here at 60 games, his extra-base pace has fallen off a bit, with 10 more for a total of 25. That places Piscotty for a tie for 10th all-time among new Cardinals. His RBI count of 38 ties him for ninth.

His best showing is 15 doubles, including a two-base hit in Saturday night’s second inning, which places Piscotty in a tie for sixth-most in team history through 60 contests. It is not really surprising, as he led the Cardinals minor league system in doubles for two consecutive seasons. That includes 2015, despite Piscotty having joined St. Louis in July.

It is some rarefied air, with Piscotty settled in behind Hall of Famers Joe Medwick and Stan Musial, tied with Enos Slaughter and Terry Moore and just ahead of Jim Bottomley and Johnny Mize. Number one all-time is George Watkins with 19 two-base hits through 60 games.

St. Louis Cardinals, first 60 career games, sorted by doubles

Player G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR XBH RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
George Watkins 60 208 185 50 67 19 3 10 32 43 16 27 .362 .422 .659 1.081
Joe Medwick 60 242 231 31 74 18 4 4 26 26 9 19 .320 .349 .485 .833
Stu Martin 60 246 218 51 76 16 3 6 25 35 23 18 .349 .413 .532 .945
Stan Musial 60 230 203 45 68 16 5 7 28 27 23 11 .335 .408 .567 .974
Jon Jay 60 175 156 31 57 16 1 3 20 16 14 23 .365 .415 .538 .954
Ripper Collins 60 210 197 27 65 15 8 2 25 45 10 13 .330 .371 .518 .889
Enos Slaughter 60 274 252 42 77 15 4 7 26 38 21 22 .306 .359 .480 .839
Stephen Piscotty 60 244 222 28 70 15 4 6 25 38 19 54 .315 .369 .500 .869
Terry Pendleton 60 257 238 35 80 15 3 1 19 31 15 29 .336 .370 .437 .807
Colby Rasmus 60 214 195 28 53 15 1 7 23 26 12 38 .272 .322 .467 .789
Del Rice 60 197 180 23 49 15 2 0 17 24 10 22 .272 .325 .378 .703
Terry Moore 60 242 231 25 60 15 2 2 19 22 9 19 .260 .288 .368 .655
Jim Bottomley 60 264 240 50 85 14 9 8 31 61 16 19 .354 .402 .588 .989
Wally Roettger 60 231 215 22 75 14 3 6 23 35 7 19 .349 .375 .526 .901
J.D. Drew 60 224 196 37 56 14 4 12 30 34 22 51 .286 .360 .582 .942
Ernie Orsatti 60 205 175 27 54 14 4 3 21 29 23 25 .309 .392 .486 .878
Lou Klein 60 261 233 36 62 14 4 4 22 22 21 27 .266 .332 .412 .744
Ray Jablonski 60 246 236 26 68 13 1 8 22 46 10 23 .288 .317 .453 .770
Johnny Mize 60 190 172 31 55 13 4 9 26 44 15 13 .320 .374 .599 .973
Tom Alston 60 249 223 25 54 13 1 4 18 30 23 39 .242 .317 .363 .680
Ray Sanders 60 220 189 26 48 13 1 5 19 29 30 22 .254 .356 .413 .769
Steve Bilko 60 231 205 17 47 13 1 3 17 23 23 44 .229 .307 .346 .653
Curt Flood 52 182 165 23 55 13 2 5 20 22 13 14 .333 .389 .527 .916
Curt Ford 60 175 154 22 45 13 1 1 15 22 19 17 .292 .368 .409 .777
Daniel Descalso 60 193 169 21 40 13 1 1 15 21 14 29 .237 .299 .343 .643

Special thanks to researcher Tom Orf for the above table.

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Brian Walton

Brian Walton runs The Cardinal Nation and The Cardinal Nation Blog, covering the St. Louis Cardinals and minor league system.
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20 Responses to “Piscotty’s First 60 Games Among Best in Cardinals History”

  1. blingboy says:

    He is a keeper. It will be fun to see how he looks in post-season. The emergence of Piscotty and Pham has been huge.

    • Brian Walton says:

      You have made quite a turnaround on Piscotty in just a few months.

      • blingboy says:

        Yes. I observe reality and adjust my position accordingly.

        • Brian Walton says:

          Too bad. If you had seen him in the minors and/or trusted my opinion, you wouldn’t have had to do a 180.

          • blingboy says:

            Like I will no doubt have to do on Wisdom and Kelly, perhaps even in this lifetime.

            IIRC, my take on Piscotty was that he was a failed 3rd baseman who did not look like he would have enough bat to have an impact as a corner outfielder in MLB. He certainly looks like a keeper now. I am all for keeping him in the lineup by any means necessary, and can see him becoming Adams’s worst nightmare in 2016. I assume we will find out next year some time what he looks like when his BABIP comes down off .390, as it was around .300 in the minors.

            • Brian Walton says:

              I did not get the Wisdom/Kelly point.

              IIRC, you downplayed Piscotty’s sustained success hitting doubles and seem too dinger-focused. But I readily admit that I did not think he would take off this quickly. As you note, some correction is bound to occur ahead. His strikeout rate also stands out against the players in the table above.

              It wouldn’t be crazy to see Adams and Piscotty share first next season with Piscotty also getting fourth OF at-bats. I think they can co-exist. On the other hand, Moss and Reynolds might have reason to be concerned about their jobs.

  2. Bw52 says:

    Getting the mighty Grichuk healthy and in the groove would be great also.The mighty Grichuk is a threat to go BOOM every AB.
    With Piscotty and Pham all showing good skills the Cards future can be looking bright in the OF.

  3. JumboShrimp says:

    One attribute of Piscotty is he is not yet known to have a sore shoulder, hamstring, elbow, or finger lignament. This is refreshing.

  4. JumboShrimp says:

    An interesting regular season final game. The walking wounded and depleted simply did not have enough left in the tank. Something for Mo to think about 2016 and thereafter.

    • Brian Walton says:

      I don’t know that Rosenthal is walking wounded or depleted. He was wild, for sure, hitting a Brewers batter in the head and he lost it from there. One side of me wanted him taken out immediately upon the beaning, but him getting the team saves record at home had to cross Matheny’s mind.

      You should actually watch the games, Jumbo, though today would not have been a good time to start.

      • JumboShrimp says:

        My watching would not affect the game one iota.

        Grichuk can’t throw normally, Holliday and Adams are slowed, Molina is OOC, Cooney and Carlos done for the year, wainwright a reliver at best.

        Great jobs by Lackey and Siegrist, Carpenter and Piscotty.

        • Brian Walton says:

          Never suggested your watching would affect the outcome. That is an odd idea.

          My point was that if you had watched the game, you would have seen what happened to Rosenthal. He beaned a batter and lost effectiveness from there.

  5. blingboy says:

    Don’t worry Brian, I am saving you a spot.

  6. blingboy says:

    I copy a comment from the main site, as it points out a possible ethical dilemma faced by the Cubs tonight.

    Posted: Today 5:44 PM
    Re: Cubs gonna take a dive tonight?
    The gist of the question posed in the title of the thread is that perhaps the Cubs would prefer their chances in a one game WC play in vs the Cards rather than against the Pirates. It would then be in their interest to take a dive so as to help that come about. Given how the respective teams have been playing, it would be a smart move. Not ethical, but smart.

    • Brian Walton says:

      I hope they do try to get cute. Good chance of such a move backfiring.

      Arrieta can also blow his Cy Young chances in the process.

      One bad win and dumb ideas pop up like mushrooms in the shade.

      • blingboy says:

        I decided to comment in the first place because I saw a similarity to the situation basement dwellers find themselves in late in the season. There is nothing practical to be gained by winning as many remaining games as possible, while their draft position will be improved if they do not win as many as possible. Both are examples of ethical dilemma.

  7. JumboShrimp says:

    Seven runs in final inning. Hard to spin as a positive or as a routine setback.

    It’s been a super year overall. Lots of bad luck too. Baseball is not an easy game.

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