The Cardinal Nation blog

Brian Walton's news and commentary on the St. Louis Cardinals (TM) and their minor league system

Putting Cardinals double plays into perspective

As I have been involved in discussions over the season with others about the level of double plays hit into by the 2011 St. Louis Cardinals, I have been challenged to be able to put it into some kind of meaningful context.

A stance taken by some is that given the Cardinals are the highest-scoring offense in the league, it only stands to reason that they would also hit into the most double plays. That might seem reasonable until better understanding the historic rate of twin killings that occurred in 2011. I started by looking at the double plays hit into by the National League leaders in runs scored for the last five years.

Year NL Runs Leader Runs Double plays
DP rank of 16
2011* Cardinals 734 165 1st
2010 Reds 790 113 T11th
2009 Phillies 820 90 16th
2008 Cubs 855 134 6th
2007 Phillies 892 125 10th
*thru 9/24 – Game 158

Only once in the four years prior to 2011 did the NL run scoring leader also rank in the top half of the league in double plays. None of the clubs were in the top third – until the Cardinals this year. The 2009 Phillies had the perfect combination – the most runs scored coupled with the fewest (16th-most) double plays.

On Sunday, the Cardinals’ double play total this season tied the NL all-time record of 166. I wanted to see how that stacks up over time in a run-scoring context. To that end, I calculated the ratio of baserunners lost via double plays to the number of runs scored by the annual league leader, going all the way back to 1996, the start of the La Russa era in St. Louis.

Year NL Runs Leader Runs DP runners lost Runners lost/Runs scored
2011* Cardinals 734 165 0.225
1998 Astros 874 146 0.167
2002 Diamondbacks 819 130 0.159
2008 Cubs 855 134 0.157
1997 Rockies 923 138 0.150
2010 Reds 790 113 0.143
2004 Cardinals 855 121 0.142
2005 Reds 820 116 0.141
2007 Phillies 892 125 0.140
2003 Braves 907 124 0.137
2006 Phillies 865 115 0.133
2000 Rockies 968 126 0.130
2001 Rockies 923 116 0.126
1996 Rockies 961 118 0.123
2009 Phillies 820 90 0.110
1999 Diamondbacks 908 94 0.104
Average 870 123 0.142
*thru 9/24 – Game 158

As the table shows, the combination of an increased quantity of double plays along with lower run scoring is a double whammy that puts the negative impact to the 2011 Cardinals at the very top of the list. In fact, the 2011 Cardinals ratio of double plays to runs scored is over twice that of several recent NL annual run-scoring leaders.

Along with the look back at the past, I pulled the comparable numbers across the NL for 2011. They follow.

2011 NL thru 9/23 Runs Runs rank DP DP rank DP/Runs Season W/L
ST. LOUIS 732 1st 165 1st 0.225 W
SAN FRANCISCO 553 16th 114 4th 0.206 W
PITTSBURGH 586 14th 120 3rd 0.205 L
CHICAGO 643 8th 122 2nd 0.190 L
HOUSTON 599 13th 108 T8th 0.180 L
FLORIDA 608 11th 107 10th 0.176 L
SAN DIEGO 575 15th 101 11th 0.176 L
ATLANTA 634 9th 109 7th 0.172 W
MILWAUKEE 685 6th 112 5th 0.164 W
WASHINGTON 606 12th 98 14th 0.162 L
LOS ANGELES 621 10th 100 T12th 0.161 W
COLORADO 705 3rd 110 6th 0.156 L
NEW YORK 694 5th 108 T8th 0.156 L
PHILADELPHIA 685 7th 100 T12th 0.146 W
CINCINNATI 716 2nd 96 15th 0.134 L
ARIZONA 697 4th 79 16th 0.113 W
NL Average 646 109 0.169

Most of the teams in the top half of the league in Runners Lost/Runs Scored ratio are losing clubs. One notable exception is San Francisco, a team with the league’s lowest-scoring offense, but its second-best pitching. (Of course, the latter category is not reflected here.)

As noted at the bottom of the prior table, the 2011 NL team average in double plays is 109. The average is 106 when St. Louis is excluded. What if the Cardinals had just been “NL average” this season?

Double plays Runs scored Runners left on base
2011 Cardinals thru 9/23 165 732 1092
2011 Cardinals improved 106 756 1127
Difference 59 24 35

In the above table, I created a hypothetical but conservative, “improved” view of what the 2011 Cardinals might have been. I took the difference of 59 additional runners between the Cards’ real double play total of 165 and the NL average of 106 and spread them proportionally according to the team’s actual percentage of runs scored (40.1%) and runners stranded (59.9%).

That equates to 24 more Cardinals baserunners that may have crossed home plate this season – had there simply been an average number of twin killings instead of a record total.

How many innings that might have extended and perhaps had a domino effect on other scores is impossible to guess. Same with the number of wins 24 more tallies would have enabled. One thing we can say with certainty is this – the Cardinals needed just two more victories to be the hunted rather than the hunter as the final series of the season unfolds.

What if?

Follow me on Twitter.
Follow The Cardinal Nation Blog on Facebook.

75 Responses to “Putting Cardinals double plays into perspective”

  1. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Thoughtful………………….. it appears the Cardinals are a special team……….somehow……….

  2. DizzyDean17 says:

    Who has made the argument that there is a correlation between runs scored and GIDPs? You just posted a bunch of numbers to point out the obvious. There is no such correlation.

    You are ignoring, or simply missing, two KEY elements here. The Cardinals lead the league in OBP and are dead last in striking out.

    I ran the numbers and through Sunday, the Cards singles plus walks plus HBP total is 98 more than the NL average. That means 98 more baserunners have stood on first base while batters who have struck out 189 times less than the NL average ply their trade. Putting the ball in play sometimes results in bad things happening. Striking out always results in bad things happening.

    To expect that a team with those numbers would be average in GIDP boggles the mind.

    Sigh.

    • crdswmn says:

      Check out the much lower BB rates for the top DP culprits, Pujols, Holliday and Molina. Way lower than previous years. Walking less because they are swinging more at pitches that were balls and hitting into DPs?

      • DizzyDean17 says:

        I’m not sure what their BB rates have to do with them grounding into double plays. Holliday is actually walking at a rate higher than his career average. Holliday and Molina are below their top GIDP numbers and Pujols consistently grounds into a lot. There’s no question he is not having a typical AP year.

  3. DizzyDean17 says:

    Another element that hasn’t been address is the lack of stolen bases. The Cards are last as a team in stolen bases and also dead last (pun intended) in caught stealing.

    I’m not sure if numbers are available for how often a runner is put in motion but I suspect that is a contributing factor to the Cards’ poor pct. of successful steals. In other words, the GIDP numbers could be even worse.

    • Brian Walton says:

      Good discussion.

      To me, the correlation between double plays and runs scored is simple. The common currency is baserunners. Every baserunner erased did not have the opportunity to score (or be stranded). Why be satisfied with league-best scoring without acknowledging that without the historic number of DPs, they could and should have scored more?

      OBP is taken into account by holding constant the percentage of runners that scored and were stranded. I don’t see any reason to assume that is not linear as there are more or fewer runners. Further, other teams with high OBP are not grounding into double plays at this frequency.

      I would think if the Cardinals started more runners, they might have fewer GIDPs. They certainly would have more caught stealing and likely a lower SB success rate. There is also the question of whether the personnel is suited to this kind of play.

      The only wildly unusual number among all these stats being discussed is GIDP. If there is a combo of others that together are way out of line, I don’t see it.

      • DizzyDean17 says:

        Once again, you are completely ignoring the low team strikeout rate. It’s one thing to have a team full of Adam Dunns, guys that walk and strikeout at historic type rates. This team is fourth in the league in walks while not striking out. 189 less K’s than the league average is a HUGE factor in the number of GIDPs.

        As for the stolen base success rate, it is, as I mentioned earlier, already the worst in the league. They are obviously not suited to running. What’s a manager to do?

        • Brian Walton says:

          I have been thinking about strikeout rate and this may be at least partially why we are viewing the picture differently.

          I am looking at what happens to the runners already on base, not what happens to the batters. One of three things happens to those runners. They are erased on the bases, score or are stranded. (As I mentioned to Jumbo below, the Mets have actually had more baserunners than StL, but a much higher strand rate.)

          In hindsight, perhaps I should have compared GIDP to baserunners, not runs scored. Still when doing that, the conclusion remains the same. The Cardinals have lost a greater percentage of runners via double plays (8.1%) than any other team (next closest is 6.6% with the lowest at 4.3%).

          In terms of percent of baserunners scoring, the Cards are not number one. They are third-best in the league. This has really been my central point all along – that they have squandered opportunities, with DPs the biggest standout. (It’s not that third-best isn’t good; it just could have been better.)

          (In percent of runners scoring, the Cards trail Arizona and Milwaukee (both division winners) with Colorado and Cincy very close behind. The Cards do have the lowest percent of stranded runners.)

          • DizzyDean17 says:

            At least you’ve been thinking about the strikeout rate but this latest analysis of comparing GIDP to total baserunners still ignores it. You can’t be serious. Are you just trying to mess with me?

            As for bringing up the Mets, they hit 202 more fly balls than the Cards and 230 less ground balls. It’s hard to GIDP when you are a fly ball hitting team.

            • Brian Walton says:

              I am serious. What does it matter what the batter does when taking a view from the perspective of what happens to the baserunners?

              In other words, my view here of the GIDP is of the runner erased, not the batter who ground into it (as he never reached base).

              Edit: I think you are explaining why they have so many GIDPs. I was not taking exception to why.

              • DizzyDean17 says:

                Well, if you’re not bringing their GIDPs into context what is this discussion about?

                This is beginning to sound like you’re complaining for the sake of complaining. I give you more credit than that.

                I had written more but you would not appreciate it. I’m done with this silliness.

                • Brian Walton says:

                  I tried to engage and explain. I am sorry the explanation is not satisfactory to you, but that is no reason to be insulting.

                  The Cards set an NL record number of DPs. They were a factor in Monday’s loss. That is worthy of note.

                  • RCWarrior says:

                    I’ve told you my thoughts on the topic, the shorten up with two strikes and punch me a ground ball philiosophy has led to more DP’s. You expand the zone with two strikes and punch balls that are close but out of the zone and this leads to poor swings put on bad pitches which leads to more ground balls.

                    It is hard to argue that striking out in these situations is better than hitting into the large number of DP’s but the case could probably be made that it is better to do just that.

                    I think the MM philosophy is a sound one to prevent a huge number of K’s but it will just have the high DP numbers as a byproduct. Like I said earlier, the one guy who refuses to change his approach, Lance B, doesn’t hit into many DP’s, and he’s as slow as Yadi. But he doesn’t expand his zone. But for the record, I would think that most baseball people would rather have the DP’s than the K’s.

                    Six of one, a half dozen of the other. You pick your poison. In St. Louis, where the smartest baseball people on the planet live, TLR is smart enought to know that K’s mean more than DP’s. His poison is the DP’s. The St. Louis fans hate K’s. Easy choice. :)

                    • WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

                      “But for the record, I would think that most baseball people would rather have the DP’s than the K’s”.

                      That as a stand alone statement is likely true………… but it has no bearing in this situation…….. We do not play like most people in baseball………. The entire “lets be aggressive” on certain counts…..is based on the premise that all other discriminating values are sustained……as related to strike zone recognition………… add the AP anomaly……an exception to all rules……… and you end up with this mess…………. Freese has to hit the ball out of the infield with the bases loaded no outs……all the pitcher can do is try to induce the DP ball……..that cuts the strike zone to only the lower half…… 2/1…..he starts his hands ….and then chases to validate the swing…..trying to shoot something up the middle……………… Hitting coaches are usually smart guys working with a whip and some meat, because lets face it……these guys aren’t Rhodes Scholars ………. its money time……its the domain of good pitch and smart hitting that produces the winner………

                      The Dave trip………for the last game…….. is unusual to say the least……. showing up on Thursday seems plausible…….. flying to Houston seems more ceremonial ……….

                      Tony likely goes Punto / Skip…………..he has to have a lead off………what, Jay and Punto

                    • crdswmn says:

                      Okay, explain this to me like I am a 6 year old, why would you prefer two outs with one swing of the bat instead of just one?

                    • WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

                      You are getting stuck on the “statistical side” of your evaluation CRD.
                      Not all chases end up as DP’s……some get through the infield…score runs…….
                      Swing and a miss rarely does a whole lot. Some are suggesting its better to takes your chances………………. in truth, expression of skill and virtuosity “always” avoids high contrasting valuations like these………. a good hitter tries to select the best options…..attempting to sustain a high qualitative “awareness” of what those options are……….. the better this is done….and prepared for…the fewer DP’s there are……….. we are a team of sloppy opportunists……..led by example………Tony cannot enforce any…….because he will not enforce the one/worst…..

                    • RCWarrior says:

                      I agree, all balls put in play are not DP’s. Some are hits that produce runs. WC is also right imo that this team does a poor job of situational hitting and I’m not sure if its because of a lack of work on those situations or just a failure to come through in the situation.

                      Its hard to come down on the hitting of this team this year as I’m fairly positive that they are in the upper division of run scorers.

                      Now defense is another story. :)

                    • crdswmn says:

                      Granted, I am being a technical here, but a ground ball that doesn’t result in two outs is not a DP, it’s a force out or a ground out with an error, etc. If you had said it is better to put the ball in play rather then K then I would have no argument. But then I go back to what I have always said, if you don’t swing at pitches out of the strike zone then you are not likely to K unless you have a blind umpire behind the plate. Swing at pitches in your zone and if you hit into a DP, so be it.

                    • RCWarrior says:

                      Crdswmn, I concur.

  4. CariocaCardinal says:

    Excellent points Diz.

    for me putting this in perspective means it is a non-issue in the big picture of thing. Would I like to see them ground in to less DP’s – of course. Is it frustrating as hell when they do — definitely. Bt focusing on DP’s when we lead the league in runs scored is somewhat silly. This team has so many other problems that are much more worrisome and have affected areas where we are not the best in the league. That is where I would be focusing my analysis.

  5. Brian Walton says:

    Monday lineup:
    1. Rafael Furcal (S) SS
    2. David Freese (R) 3B
    3. Albert Pujols (R) 1B
    4. Matt Holliday (R) LF
    5. Lance Berkman (S) RF
    6. Yadier Molina (R) C
    7. Ryan Theriot (R) 2B
    8. Jon Jay (L) CF
    9. Jaime Garcia (L) P

  6. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    There is a correlation between everything in this world………………. The answer to this quandary has already been given……………….. the RELEVANCE of supposedly knowing or quantifying or CORRELATING activities with such complex influence is problematic………….at best…………… the Pujols effect in full in this one………. with a new hitting coach and the absents of AP/TLR tactical influenced competitive stratagems……..the Cardinals will return to the norm………… Research the last 2 years of MM films and interviews…………. what is never included in any of these inquiry’s, is the efficiency of our opponents observational/tactical response with their pitch strategies…………… obvious??????????? hardly……
    local fans seem seem to ignore what is so apparent to opposing scouts………tony has bent over backwards to keep AP from facing what he now faces……… he has used bad judgments from a competitive stand point all year long………….. as an example, let me remind you of the early season worries about opening up first base……..leaving an automatic walk to AP…….. it influenced every thing from game situations to the character and the nature of the 1 and 2 hitters……………. think about it……..Tony likes to have a power bat hitting 2nd????????????? so he isn’t expected to sacrifice??????????? opening up first?????? oh yea……….number two will get more better pitches………give me a break……..when it was discovered that AP had brought a new approach to the plate this year…..and that it was discovered to be inferior………the opposition attacked him relentlessly……..his distorted opportunism creating the jog to first double play monster that we have enjoyed so much……………. Brian……I thought your work was relevant…….it dispelled certain myths…….

  7. DizzyDean17 says:

    I just got around to reading the other double play themed thread on this blog.

    Did somebody really suggest that it’s better to strike out than hit into a double play with a runner at third?

    And then make the claim that swinging at balls outside the strike zone is a reason for hitting into double plays?

    Good Gawd!

    This team hits into a lot double plays because:
    A) High OBP – Tops in NL
    B) Slow team speed – Last in stolen bases and success rate
    C) High contact hitters – Last in K’s by wide margin
    D) Hard contact hitters – Check below

    This team averages hitting line drives 20.1% of the time compared to the league average of 18.9% The ground ball percentage is also higher than the league average, 47.8% to 45.2%.

    Guys without great speed that hit the ball hard on those trajectories and don’t strike out often are bound to hit into more double plays than average. I’ll take it every time over watching guys stand there and watch strike three go by time and time again.

    Think about this: 189 less strikeouts than the average team means there are roughly 125 more balls put into play with 0-1 outs. There’s a very good chance that about half of those occur with a runner at first base. You don’t expect to set a record but nobody should be surprised that the 2011 Cardinals hit into a lot of DP’s.

    • WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

      Is that some chest thumping I here? From Dizzy?

    • Nutlaw says:

      Of course, players not running out ground balls is also one cause for higher double play rates.

      Making contact with balls outside of the strike zone will indeed often lead to poorer results than making contact with balls inside of the strike zone. Connecting with low pitches in particular will result in increased ground ball rates. For instance, Pujols is swinging at 31% of pitches thrown outside of the strike zone to him this season compared to a 21% career mark and he’s connecting with a career high 78% them compared to a 69% career mark. There’s some shift in the norms within the data over the years, but not that much.

      • WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

        Good one Nut……………….. Pitch to contact is a viable strategy only when you have a very sophisticated defensive positioning system………. Cards do………. Dave’s system is all about where you might best induce contact that yields a positive result……….DP, by necessity is the gold ring……….
        I’m going to take a “wild guess” and suggest that Tony must of asked Dave at some point ” Dave, where are all of these DP coming from…………”? …….I just bet Dave had an opinion…..based on his expertise in that area………… So……how come that didn’t helped WC …… Why didn’t knowing the reason lessen the intensity of our record run………… Answer……….read the thread……..

    • crdswmn says:

      You know what Diz, you can disagree with me and that’s just fine because I don’t pretend to be a know it all like I lot of people do, but being a horse’s ass about it is not necessary.

      I made an observation from am admitted untrained eye. I will continue to do so if I please and the earth will keep spinning on its axis.

    • crdswmn says:

      Oh and btw I am not suggesting that the batter stand there and take strike three rather than hit into a DP. I am suggesting he not swing at balls and take a walk instead.

  8. Kansasbirdman says:

    Well, been reading but hadn’t had time to post.

    to comment on things from the past several stories:

    The Braves losing streak has been more from pitching (injuries) than batting.

    And to reiterate the subject of my first ever post: Pujols contract-

    Does it make the union happy if AP is “offered” the biggest contract in history even if he doesn’t accept it from another team? The Cards FO has the job of convincing everyone the offer made is the highest we can go. They have already started the pr machine in motion as I believe it was the PD (or maye St. Louis Today) that reported their last offer 22-25 mil per year for 9 years was the highest they could go.

  9. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Lee has given up 4 extra base hits in the first 2 innings………….. the Braves seemed encouraged.

  10. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    SS Rafael Furcal

    3B David Freese

    1B Albert Pujols

    LF Matt Holliday

    RF Lance Berkman

    C Yadier Molina

    2B Ryan Theriot

    CF Jon Jay

    P Jaime Garcia

    Read more: http://www.stltoday.com/sports/baseball/professional/cardinal-beat/article_75ee259c-e882-11e0-b6e9-001a4bcf6878.html#ixzz1Z6fHPHvn

    Tony puts the speed merchant up front in the 2 hole……….. brings Yadi into the action at 6……… wisdom……….or is he trying to set up AP? Freese will go OPO but is a liability after…..looking for 1st and 3rd situations for Albert not runners at 1 and 2nd for Holiday……….

  11. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    AP tries to turn a ball on the bottom OS corner at 1/0 ? would have been a DP ball……..he is using noticeably less crouch in his first AB……….

  12. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Tony outsmarts himself……… now they pitch around Molina to get Theriot/Jay / pitcher………and he starts the runners pressuring a boarderlind swing by Theriot at 3/2…………like Jay who is Ofer-ever is a threat…………. I like Craig 6th in center

  13. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    did AP go through a Stop Sign there? Oquendo was almost standing on the bag…….

  14. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    This is not a game when you wait to make changes…………….Theriot out …… you gotta dump Garcia at this point……….

  15. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    2/1 automatic swing……..DP pitch………..DP…………….. idiots///////////

    • WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

      Text book problem………………… it likely costs them the season……..Philly put in a nobody in the 7th to pitch…………… bases juiced………….. no outs…….ball has to leave the infield……..any college team would have him doing push ups and riding pine…………. repeat….. that pitch was no accident…Houston knew what to throw…..even if the go to 3/1………..

  16. Brian Walton says:

    Two more DPs in first five innings. Rally killers.

    • JumboShrimp says:

      The more runners we get on base, the more double plays we ring up. Your claim of our “problem” is only an indicator of our superior ability to get on base.

      • Brian Walton says:

        The lowly Mets have had more baserunners than the Cardinals this season yet only 2/3 the DPs (110 vs. 166 coming into today). Their problem is a league-high stranded runners total.

        Edit: Colorado and Cincy are similar. Each has had less than a dozen fewer baserunners than StL, but a much lower DP rate and higher strand rate. Of course, as already noted, all three have scored fewer runs than StL.

  17. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Kmac had terrible body language…………Tony let him pitch………… the Furcal injury is actually a plus in my mind right now……….. lets see some Dickson or Sanchez

  18. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    MM rules………don’t get cheated…………Descalso needs a single………and he gives it a full body swing…………..then he commits early and chase out of the zone………… its like some sort of sick joke.

  19. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Asto’s hitter paces a ball it a hit……..

  20. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    AP was taking the labored baby steps when he came in to lead off………??????? I don’t like/

  21. Nutlaw says:

    That was a ballsy double steal! Wow.

  22. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Jay goes OPO twice…………for the money………he turns it loose………no discipling…wild ass swinging……………………….and he is blowing bubbles………sick

    • WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

      my point here is there is no situational dialog or expectation with these guy…….. MM does not teach a paced swing……………Jay should have been thinking take it deep….take the fly ball toward the Crawford boxes again……….he was trying to turn on two pitches…..swinging as hard as he could…….

  23. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Nice controlled swing by Danny that time……….good battle by Matt……….Albert got center cut and is pulling off of it again………..

  24. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Incredible…………………………. we deserve to lose………. Molina does the HR trot…….could have cost him a base,,,,,,,,,and then shows that he can run……….stupidly…………

  25. Brian Walton says:

    Tough way to lose. Dotel not a smooth fielder to say the least.

  26. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    The problem isn’t the loss……………..its how this will effect the Braves……….. They win a game and they have a playoff at least…………they can see the light at the end of the tunnel………. Tony had to have given the green light Theriot……………. Dave is coming down for a reason…….and it ain’t baseball….

  27. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Phillies aren’t going to sweep the Braves……….their best line is to hope for a playoff that the Cardinals win……they could foreseeably groom for that possibility…… thats if we can beat Houston twice………. Westbrooke really isn’t the man for the job…………lets hope we hit…………

  28. CariocaCardinal says:

    I would guess the same hitting tactics that have resulted in them leading the league in runs has resulted in the high number of double plays. I don’t doubt that if you take away the aggressiveness that has resulted in the DP’s you would also cut down on the number of runs scored. Is that what people want? Less DP’s with less runs?

    • Brian Walton says:

      Some might suggest that the station-to-station baseball played much of the season was not aggressive enough and may have led to more DPs than if runners had been running.

      • CariocaCardinal says:

        I was talking about aggressiveness at the plate, not the base paths.

        • Brian Walton says:

          Yes, I understand, just as I hope you understand my related but different point. To your comment, I am not sure how hardwired aggressiveness at the plate is to both high run scoring and high DPs or how that might be quantified. Pitches seen per at-bat? Could they score as much but hit into fewer DPs if they were more selective situationally? If they started more runners? Don’t know…

  29. WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

    Brewers have a runner at third with no outs……..and lose………. They could end up in Philly if they’re not careful…………….

  30. RCWarrior says:

    Last night was a tough loss but I don’t believe anyone is in a panic. The Braves are just horrible right now offensively and will lose at least one, maybe two games verses Philly, who isn’t much better right now than even the Braves. I think the Cards will get in.

    The surprising thing right now is that the Phillies seem to be trying hard to beat the Braves………for a chance to play the Cardinals, who may very well be the hottest team in the game today. This Cards team could go all the way imo. And I’ll even go out on a limb and say I’m betting that the Cards beat the Phils in round one. How’s that for drinking the kool aid?

    • WestCoastbirdWatcher says:

      Drinking something,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, DBacks have a few pitchers………Phills remember what happened last year………….. they want the Cardinals…..and momentum……… AP has started his “I have control” pulling off the ball cycle again………… If he doesn’t catch it right now…..thats trouble……….Molina is producing, but with it comes the “moody” flippant pitch calling………..thats shown itself again yesterday……..
      Houston is not a good team…………. if by some mysterious chance Theriot plays SS today…… or starts anywhere….. break out the tar and feathers……….

      The Freese start at the 2# spot was an Albert provision the killed us yesterday………. but in truth Descalso looks like a Zombie at the plate………….. MM is not even close to being an adequate game situation hitting coach………. TLR never was………. We have to win both games. The Phillies will try to bleed one to guarantee a playoff…….the figure the Cards win at home on Thursday helps their cause. They want ST Louis………

      • RCWarrior says:

        No but I obviously need to be drinking something. :)

        I imagine most of the youngsters are emotionally drained. The mental toughness that is required to play for Tony does wear one out at the end. Freese and Jay are grinding to be sure. I commend those kids on making it through to this point and remaining sane. It is not for the weak of heart.

        The Cards will win the remaining two games. Wandy was the one guy I thought could possibly beat them by keeping the Stro’s in it till the end.

        If there is a playoff I believe the Cards will win and then off to Philly for round one.

        AP has finished strong, we agree that he plays for himself but that is who he is, and that is a pretty damn good player, even with his faults. Yadi has been clutch down the stretch as well.

        The team has had as good a September as one could have expected and has put itself in the thick of the race. What more could anyone expect.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.